Category: | Scrivener

Embed Websites in Scrivener (and Minimize Distractions)

(This post assumes you’re already using Scrivener. If you haven’t made the leap yet, check out my post “5 Reasons You Should Be Using Scrivener.”)

I have a love/hate thing going with the Internet when it comes to my writing. On the one hand, I love that I can look up any damn thing whenever I need to. I mean seriously, how did people write novels before Google? On the other hand, it is so easy to get distracted once that browser window is open. Well, I recently discovered a little Scrivener trick that allows me to embed websites inside the project I’m working on so that I can reference them without going online. Brilliant. Continue Reading →

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5 Reasons You Should Be Using Scrivener


Buy Scrivener

I write a lot about Scrivener and how much I love it, so I’m always shocked to learn that writer friends are still working in Word. Whenever it comes up, I find myself explaining why they really should make the switch. I’m telling you, it’s the best $45 you’ll ever spend on your writing. (And if you enter the code APRILDAVILA at checkout you’ll save 20% at www.getscrivener.com)

Here are 5 reasons why. Continue Reading →

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Scrivener Binder Icons

(This post assumes you’re already using Scrivener. If you haven’t made the leap yet, check out my post “5 Reasons You Should Be Using Scrivener.”)

Recently, I started to notice subtle differences in the appearance of my Scrivener binder icons. For those who don’t know, the binder is the column to the left of where you write, the section that holds all your files and folders, like a real binder might. It’s kind of like home base for your manuscript.

So what do those different icons mean? And why do they change as we work on our project? I did a little research. Continue Reading →

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Color Coding Scrivener

color coding scrivener

(This post assumes you’re already using Scrivener. If you haven’t made the leap yet, check out my post “5 Reasons You Should Be Using Scrivener.”)

Color coding Scrivener is one of my favorite little writerly tricks. It’s just so freaking handy. Here’s how it works.

In the binder of your project simply right-click on any item (or selection of items) and move your mouse down the resulting mento to “Label.” You can chose one of the existing labels, or click the bottom option there to edit and create your very own labels. To get the colors to show in your binder, you simply go to VIEW > USE LABEL COLOR IN > BINDER. Continue Reading →

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Daily Word Count in Scrivener

(This post assumes you’re already using Scrivener. If you haven’t made the leap yet, check out my post “5 Reasons You Should Be Using Scrivener.”)

I try to write 500 words every day (except during NaNaWriMo – all rules go out the window in November). It’s easy enough to keep track on when I’m working on a new draft, or even if I just get rolling on a small segment, but when I’m at the stage that I’m at now, when I’m editing and trying to fine tune, it gets much more difficult. These days, I monitor time spent instead of words written, but I still like to know, at the end of the day, how many words I added to my project.

So I am very excited to share that I learned a new hack for Scrivener to help with this. (Many thanks to UCLA Extension writing guru Mark Sarvas for this one.)

In Scrivener, go to the Projects drop down menu, then click on Project Targets (shortcut command shift T), and you will get a little window that pops up to tell you how many words (net) you have added in your current session. What’s more, if you click on the options button, you can adjust when the counter resets. I have mine programmed to reset every night at midnight.

SCRIVENER WORD COUNT

If you give it a try, you’ll see that you can also track total words written, which I like because when you’re working on a section in Scrivener, you only see the word count for that section. I find it deeply satisfying to watch my total word count creep higher and higher.

I know there are about a thousand little Scrivener hacks that I could probably use, but it’s always a fine line between learning to use a great tool and just flat out procrastinating. Some day, when I have nothing else to do, I will spend a whole day watching Scrivener tutorials on YouTube, and then I will be a Scrivener master (wha-ha-ha), but for now I will settle for finishing my novel.

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