Grammar Geeks Rejoice

I wouldn’t describe myself as cheap, so much as frugal (I think, in this economy, “frugal” has come to encompass a wider range penny pinching than it did in say 2004). So when I decided a few years ago to invest in a resource I think all writers need to have at their fingertips, the Chicago Manual of Style, I admit, I went to Amazon.com and bought a used copy of the 15th edition for $3, instead of the newer 16th edition for $40. It was kind of a no-brainer. I mean, how often do the rules of grammar really change?

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Apparently, often enough that I am now officially behind the times. I was researching a project last night when I came across The Chicago Manual of Style website, and a page that lists the most important updates in the 16th edition. Cheapskates rejoice!

You can find the list here

, if you’re interested (and don’t try to pretend that updates in grammar rules don’t get you hot), but for me the biggest changes were as follows:

Northern California and Southern California are now officially capitalized as geographic and cultural entities. ‘Bout time.

While “Internet” and “World Wide Web” are still capitalized, “web,” “website,” and the like can use the lowercase.

Brand names that start with lowercase letters (iPad, iPod, and such), still use the lowercase, even if they start the sentence or heading.

There’s a lot more, most of it dealing with minutia, but have no doubt, I’ll be printing it out and tucking it into the ratty cover of my lowly 15th edition.

1 Comment

  1. Annlee
    Jul 19, 2012

    Great tip. Thanks, April! -ae

    Respond

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