Author Archive | April

Stop Being an Aspiring Writer

For some reason, I love reading self-help books when I travel. Whenever one of these get-your-shit-together kind of titles pops up I always hesitate to buy them because I don’t want anyone to see me carrying it around (because – embarassing). But there’s something about being in an airport, among the crowds of anonymous faces, that seems to open up space and compel me toward their bright covers.

aspiring writerSuch was the case this last weekend in the Portland airport. The kids and I were coming home from a spring break vacation at my sister’s place and I was drawn to the bright yellow cover of “You Are A Badass.”

Apparently, I AM a Badass

I’ve been curious about the book, but every time I come across it I read the blurb on the back: “…the self-help book for people who desperately want to improve their lives…” and I put it down. I’m not desperate to improve my life. My life is pretty good, actually. So I don’t know what compelled me to buy it this time, but I’m glad I did. The plane sat on the tarmac for three hours before it took off – something about engine trouble – and I finished the whole book in one very long day of travel.

The general theme of the book is that you can change the things in your life that aren’t working like you want them to. You do it by looking really closely at your own relationship to those things.

The Scripts that Play

For instance, the author, Jen Sincero, points out that most of us have really conflicted feelings about money. We hate it, but we want it. We love having it, but it is the root of all evil. She encourages us to look at why we have all these conflicted emotions, and then change the script that runs in our heads. And thus… the affirmations.

Affirmations

The author proposes, and I agree, that the stories we run in our heads influence everything we do. And so, we need to be more intentional about the scripts we let play out. She suggested writing down affirmations, putting them somewhere you see them all day, repeating them in your head all day long as you go about your business.

As I read what she wrote, I was reminded of the time that I decided to take the word “aspiring” out of my description of myself. For years I had been writing, every day, on all kinds of projects, but still when people asked I would say I was an “aspiring” writer. What a bunch of BS. As writers, we know better than anyone how much words matter. So I stopped using that word.

I choked on it the first few times, saying “I’m a writer.” It was hard. But the more I did it, the more people saw me as a writer. The more people saw me as a writer the more I felt like a writer. It was just this wonderful positive feedback cycle.

Get Uncomfortable

That, Sincero says, is one of the most important features of a good affirmation. It needs to make you uncomfortable at first. It needs to feel almost like you’re lying to yourself. Or, if it’s easier, start with the word aspiring, then remove it. For example:

I’m an aspiring writer.
Make it: I’m a writer.

or

I’m an aspiring best-selling author.
Make it: I’m a best-selling author.

This second one is where I’m at now. That’s the actual affirmation I’m using. Of course, I’m not going to walk around telling people I’m a best-selling author. That would be lying (and frankly delusional), but I AM going to put it on a post-it in my bullet journal, where only I see it, and read it multiple times a day. What harm can it do, really? None. And there’s a chance that, as I reaffirm that idea over and over, I will be motivated to do the work that a best-selling author does, busting my ass every day to make my reality match up with the affirmation.

Wherever you are in your journey as a writer, I would highly recommend taking a look at the stories you tell yourself. For a more guidance, check out Sincero’s book. It’s a quick read, and totally worth the time, even if you’re not stuck on a plane for hours and hours going nowhere.

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Seven Steps to Writing a Novel

I came across this video recently and, even though I’m not a big fan of the title (I’m skeptical of anyone who touts easy steps to a bestselling novel), it has some really good advice for those who are struggling to get words on the page. I also like that he breaks down his ideas into 7 basic steps, simple things we can all do.

If you’re having a hard time getting started with your writing, or sticking with it, definitely take 14 minutes and give this a watch:

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An Atlas, Not An Outline

an atlas not an outlineI recently had the pleasure of hearing the author Percival Everett talk about his work. The man has written 30 novels over the course of his career and he’s still going strong. Anyway, one of the audience members asked him if he outlines. He responded that he uses an atlas, not an outline.

What’s An Atlas

For those of you who have never experienced navigating a long trip without a GPS, an atlas is a book of maps. We used to take these books with us when we drove somewhere far away.

Every night of the journey, you would sit in your cheap hotel room or your tent and trace the road you had traveled that day. Then you would look at all the possible routes that lay ahead, turning to the appropriate pages to see more map when you got to the edge of the page. You would consider detours if you saw something cool nearby and debate the value of the scenic route vs the freeway.

Writing From an Outline

Writing from a strict outline is kind of like using a GPS to travel. TURN RIGHT, TURN LEFT, KILL YOUR MENTOR CHARACTER HERE.

But treating your outline like an atlas is really appealing to me. When I think in these terms, I see my outline as a map of the world I’m creating. I know I’m starting in one place, and I need to get to this other place, but everything else gets flattened out in front of me and I start to see things in a much more appealing, much more creative way.

My Story Atlas

The metaphor of the atlas is most apt when I’m actually writing. Because I do write with an outline (always will from now on), I start with a bullet point, something like “Tanya discovers her husband is cheating on her.”

I set out in my writing, heading toward that place, knowing that I will get there, but also open to possibility, and my route almost always changes as soon as words hit the screen. I find myself in that wonderfully weird place where your story almost seems to dictate itself. When I’m really focused, I discover story elements I never expected to find. It’s magical really. And somehow I do always end up where I intended, it’s just that the journey never looks like I thought it would.

It’s everything I always loved about road trips with my BFF, without my legs sticking to the seat of the car.

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Literary Events in Los Angeles for the week of March 26, 2018

LitLifeLA March 26 2018

Can you believe we’re a quarter of the way through 2018 already? In case you haven’t, mark your calendars for the LA Festival of Books coming up in April. It’s going to be awesome (as always).
Here’s your update for this week. Enjoy…


MONDAY


Tom DeLonge and AJ Hartley discuss and sign Sekret Machines Book 1: Chasing Shadows

Buy the book
Monday, March 26, 2018
7pm
Barnes & Nobel, The Grove at Farmers Market
189 The Grove Drive Suite K 30
Los Angeles, CA 90036


TUESDAY


Christine Schutt and Kim O’Neil fiction reading: Dangerous Women and Indecisive Men

Buy the book
Tuesday, March 27, 2018
7:00pm
The Last Bookstore
453 S Spring St – Ground Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013


WEDNESDAY


Christina Lynch’s The Italian Party, and conversation with Anne Flett

Buy the book
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
7:00pm
Chevalier’s Books
126 N Larchmont Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90004


Otis College of Art and Design Presents: Javier Zamora

Buy the book
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
7:30pm
The Forum, Goldsmith Campus
9045 Lincoln Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA. 90045


Bruce Holbert reads reads from his new novel Whiskey with Elizabeth McCracken

Buy the book
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
7:30pm
Skylight Books
1818 N Vermont Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90027


Clarice Lispector’s The Chandelier with Translator Magdalena Edwards, Elaine Blair and David Shook

Buy the book
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
7:30pm
The Last Bookstore
453 S Spring St – Ground Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013


THURSDAY


Natalia Sylvester’s Everyone Knows You Go Home, in conversation with Jade Chang

Buy the book
Thursday, March 29, 2018
7:00pm
Chevalier’s Books
126 N Larchmont Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90004


SATURDAY


Sasha Grey discusses and signs The Juliette Society, Book III: The Mismade Girl

Buy the book
Saturday, March 31, 2018
4:00pm
Book Soup
8818 Sunset Boulevard
West Hollywood, CA 90069

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Using the Scrivener Timeline

Today we’re exploring one of the coolest new features in the recent Scrivener 3.0 upgrade: the timeline. (This post assumes you’ve already upgraded. If not, you can read my post about the new version here, and you can save 20% off the price of the upgrade if you use the code APRILDAVILA at getscrivener.com.)

Scrivener Timeline

The Scrivener Timeline feature is so intuitive, it’s hard to believe that it wasn’t one of the first things developed, back in version 1.0. But it was worth the wait. Here’s how it works.

Label Your Chapters

The first step is to label your chapters/sections/folders (whatever unit of your story you want to work with, really, for this example I chose chapters). Do this by right clicking the name of the chapter (not the icon), and choosing the option for “label.” It should look something like this:

Scrivener Timeline

Now, you can use the colors provided there, or you can click edit and make those colors represent anything you want. Maybe you have four POVs in your story. Maybe you jump around in time. Maybe you have alternate universes in your story, or you move from planet to planet. Who knows. It’s your story. Point is, you can change the labels. For this example, I’m going with POV. Here’s what it looks like once I’ve edited the labels to represent the four POVs of my story:

Scrivener Timeline

It’s important to note that you won’t see any sign of those labels in the binder (that column of items on the left) unless you go to VIEW > USE LABEL COLOR IN > BINDER. Then it’ll look like this (see image on the left there).

And this is kind of neat and all, but where it really gets useful is when you click to go to corkboard view. To do that, you can either click the little icon at the top (just right of the header bar) that looks like a waffle.

OR you can cherry pick the items you want to work with (COMMAND-click on my mac), then click the icon at the bottom right of your screen to display those items in the corkboard.

Scrivener Timeline

Now, if I zoom out a bit, you can see how this looks with all of my chapters lined up by whose POV their told from:

Scrivener Timeline

Looking at it like that I can see that my story starts out with more of Sam’s POV, then kind of shifts to more of Alex’s POV. Maybe I intended that, maybe not.

A Few Cool Things to Know

You can change the size and spacing of the cards which really helps a writer see all their cards in whatever space they happen to have. I like my little laptop screen, but I know some writers work on big ‘ol screens, and this feature works for both.

If you move a card around (say from one timeline to another, or to a spot earlier or later in the story) it will move accordingly in your binder. Even the color will change automatically.

You can add research to your timeline. Say you’re writing a historical novel and you want to lay out the actual historical timeline next to your story, simple create documents in your research folder for each event you want on the timeline, and label them something like “historical.”

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Literary Events in Los Angeles for the week of March 19, 2018

Dear readers, I would love to know a little more about you. Please take a few seconds to answer three simple questions for me. Thanks!

And now back to our regularly scheduled programming…


TUESDAY


Kate Rorick, with Lindy Booth, discusses and signs The Baby Plan

Buy the book
Tuesday, March 20, 2018
7:00pm
Book Soup
8818 Sunset Boulevard
West Hollywood, CA 90069


Junot Díaz presents his new children’s book Islandborn

Buy the book
Tuesday, March 20, 2018
6:00pm
Skylight Books
1818 N Vermont Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90027


WEDNESDAY


Jonathan Ames discusses and signs You Were Never Really Here

Buy the book
Wednesday, March 21, 2018
7:00pm
Book Soup
8818 Sunset Boulevard
West Hollywood, CA 90069


THURSDAY


Book Soup and WeHo Reads present Chelsey Johnson, with Carrie Brownstein (Portlandia, Sleater Kinney), discussing her debut novel, Stray City

Buy the book
Thursday, March 22, 2018
7:00pm – $27 includes a copy of the book
West Hollywood Public Library
City Council Chambers
625 N. San Vicente Boulevard
West Hollywood, CA 90069


A.G. Lombardo reads from his novel Graffiti Place with David Ulin

Buy the book
Thursday, March 22, 2018
7:30pm
Skylight Books
1818 N Vermont Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90027


Obsidio (The Illuminae Files Series #3) with Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

Buy the book
Thursday, March 22, 2018
7:00pm – a “wristbanded event”
The Grove at Farmers Market
189 The Grove Drive Suite K 30
Los Angeles, CA 90036


FRIDAY


Aminatta Forma reads from her new novel Happiness with Laila Lalami

Friday, March 23, 2018
7:30pm
Skylight Books
1818 N Vermont Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90027


3 NOVELISTS & A POET

Novelists Bruce Ferber, David Kukoff, and David Rocklin and poet Jim Natal read from new work.
Friday, March 23, 2018
8:00pm
Beyond Baroque
681 N. Venice Blvd.
Venice, CA 90291


SUNDAY


Vroman’s Local Author Day introduces Deborah Phipps, Delleon Weins, George Crain, and Whiskey Emerson

Buy The Enlightenment of Hanna Krusher
Sunday, March 25, 2018
4:00pm
Vroman’s Bookstore
695 E. Colorado Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91101


Luis Alberto Urrea discusses and signs The House of the Broken Angels

Buy the book
Sunday, March 25, 2018
3:00pm to 4:00pm
DIESEL, A Bookstore
225 26th Street
Santa Monica, CA 90402


Nebraska Girl Open Reading

Sign-ups at 1:30 PM. Hosted by Wyatt Underwood.
Sunday, March 25, 2018
2:00pm
Beyond Baroque
681 N. Venice Blvd.
Venice, CA 90291


Bestselling author J.A. Jance at Buena Vista branch of Burbank Public Library

Buy the book
Sunday, March 25, 2018
2:00-4:00 PM
Buena Vista Branch
Burbank Public Library
300 North Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA, 91505


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Writing the Query Letter Synopsis

query letter synopsisA few weeks back I published a post about sending out a successful query, with a few thoughts on what I thought I did right. One of the main things on that list was spending time on my query letter synopsis to make it as good as it could be.

Since then, a couple of my regular readers (you know who you are) have been encouraging me to share more, to be more specific and post the actual content of my query. I hesitated, because it feels really personal for some reason. I guess it’s personal in the same way that my story is personal, and I’m still adjusting to the idea of it going out into the world.

The Query Letter Synopsis

But I get why it’s of interest. I did a lot of research as I was getting started (check out this article to get started) and I certainly benefited by reading what other people were willing to share of their queries. So today is the day. And even though I cringe to do it, I’m going to share the many iterations of my query letter synopsis along with the thought process I went through to arrive at my final version. My sincere hope is that it will help others out there who are writing their own queries.

Here goes…

Take 1:

I started by writing without too much self-editing, because that’s how I roll with pretty much all of my writing.

Here’s what I got:

142 Ostriches is the story of 22-year-old Tallulah Jones, who wants nothing more than to get out of her small, desolate town in the Mojave Desert. Just weeks before she is scheduled to leave the family ostrich ranch for a job in Montana, Tallulah’s grandmother dies and leaves her the sole inheritor of 142 ostriches. To her extended family’s disappointment, she decides to sell the ranch, but her plans are thwarted when the birds stop laying eggs. As Tallulah does everything in her power to force the sale through, the fragile stability of her family, which has for fifty years been predicated on ignoring unpleasant truths, begins to crumble. To take control of her own life, Tallulah must face the reality of her grandmother’s suicide, her mother’s alcoholism, and her uncle’s deeply buried anger.

Things that work:

  • The title is front and center.
  • The setting of the Mojave is given early on, as is the family ostrich ranch.
  • My main character is introduced by name, along with her age and her greatest desire.
  • I explain the barriers to what she wants.

Things that are weak:

  • It’s wordy (“who wants nothing more,” “dies and leaves her the sole inheritor,” “does everything in her power”), and all of these phrases edge on cliche/boring.
  • It’s missing one of the key components of the story which is the question surrounding the grandmother’s death.

Take 2:

142 Ostriches is the story of 22-year-old Tallulah Jones who inherits her grandmother’s ostrich ranch in the Mojave Desert. Desperate to get out of their desolate small town, and having already been offered a job in Montana, Tallulah decides to sell the ranch as quickly as possible, but her plans are thwarted when the birds stop laying eggs. As Tallulah does everything in her power to force the sale through, the fragile stability of her family, which has for fifty years been predicated on ignoring unpleasant truths, begins to crumble. To take control of her own life, Tallulah must face the reality of her grandmother’s suicide, her mother’s alcoholism, and her uncle’s deeply buried anger.

Things that are working:

  • Better words (desperate, desolate, thwarted, predicated) replace wordy phrases.
  • I get the question of grandma’s death in there at the end.
  • It’s 20 words shorter.

Still not good:

  • It would be good to get the question of grandma’s death in there sooner, because in the story that intrigue starts on page one. It’s not a side note.
  • It misses the fact that my main character is not a stranger to the ranch. This is her home. It would be a very different story if she were a city girl who inherits an ostrich ranch.
  • The second half is still kind of wordy and cliche.

At this point I sent it to a couple of trusted writer friends (who know my story) for feedback, so Take 3 actually gets longer as I try to work in ideas at their suggestions.

Take 3:

142 Ostriches is the story of 22-year-old ranch hand Tallulah Jones who inherits the family ostrich business after her grandmother dies under questionable circumstances. Desperate to get out of their desolate Mojave town, Tallulah decides to sell the ranch as quickly as possible, but her plans are thwarted when the birds stop laying eggs. While guarding the secret of the missing eggs, Tallulah does everything in her power to force the sale through, while her family descends on the ranch like vultures. When Tullulah’s mother, whom she hasn’t seen in a decade, arrives days late for the funeral and wreaking of cheep rye, the fragile stability of her family, which has for fifty years been predicated on ignoring unpleasant truths, begins to crumble. To take control of her own life, Tallulah must pull her head out of the sand and face the reality of her grandmother’s almost certain suicide, her mother’s alcoholism, her uncle’s covetous anger, and her own aching loneliness.

Things that are working:

  • Got the “questionable circumstances” of grandma’s death in there at the top.
  • I added the fact that my main character takes a deceptive tact in trying to hide the fact that the birds have stopped laying eggs as she attempts to force the sale through. This gives a better sense of what she is doing to clear the hurdles in front of her.
  • I like the “pull her head out of the sand” line. It is a story about ostriches, after all.
  • There are more details about the family, but…

Not working:

  • It’s too long again.
  • Even though the I like the imagery of vultures, it seems like too many birds for one synopsis.
  • The “to take control of her own life” feels cliche.

Take 4:

22-year-old ranch hand Tallulah Jones wants nothing more than to escape the desolate desert town where she has lived and worked with her grandmother since she was a girl. But when her grandmother dies under questionable circumstance, Tallulah finds herself the sole inheritor of the family ostrich business. Still hoping to build a life for herself away from the ranch, Tallulah quickly arranges to sell her inheritance, but her plans are thwarted when the birds stop laying eggs. Guarding the secret of the missing eggs, Tallulah endeavors to force the sale through while her extended family descends on the ranch. To take control of her own life, Tallulah must pull her head out of the sand and face the 50-year legacy of a family in turmoil: the reality of her grandmother’s almost certain suicide, her mother’s alcoholism, her uncle’s covetous anger, and the 142 ostriches whose lives are in her hands.

Things that are working:

  • I like that last line, where I explain the title of the book.
  • There are some good verbs in there: escape, guard, endeavor, descend.
  • I’ve got the main plot points covered.
  • It matches the tone of the book.
  • I’m thinking I’m close but…

Not working:

  • Still hate that “take control of her own life” line. Ug.
  • Not sure about introducing her as a “ranch hand” in the first line like that.
  • The setting of the ostrich ranch has been pushed to the fourth line. Not good.
  • It’s still a little longer than I’d like.

At this point I was ready to say “eff it,” good enough, but my husband (what would I do without him?), encouraged me to dig in and get to where I was genuinely satisfied with it. So, deep breath,

Take 5:

142 Ostriches follows 22-year-old Tallulah Jones, who wants nothing more than to escape her life as a hired hand on the family’s ostrich ranch in the Mojave Desert. But when her grandmother dies under questionable circumstances, Tallulah finds herself the sole heir of the business just days before the birds mysteriously stop laying eggs. Guarding the secret of the suddenly barren birds, Tallulah endeavors to force through a sale of the ranch, a task that is only complicated when her extended family descends, threatening her ambitions and eventually her life. With no options left, Tallulah must pull her head out of the sand and face the 50-year legacy of a family in turmoil: the reality of her grandmother’s almost certain suicide, her mother’s alcoholism, her uncle’s covetous anger, and the 142 ostriches whose lives are in her hands.

Final tweaks:

  • I cut 12 words to get it down to 138 words, which will fit nicely into a query letter.
  • The phrases “just days before” and “suddenly barren birds” give a better sense of the urgency of story and the tight timeframe I use in telling it.
  • The phrase “threatening her ambitions and eventually her life,” hints at the fact that this is a story that goes beyond family squabbles. Shit gets serious.
  • I rewrote “take control of her life” into “with no options left…” Because that’s where a story should turn. She doesn’t step up because she’s all so eager to take control of her life. She steps up because she fucking has to.

So there you have it.

It would have been much easier to leave it as it was after the first pass, but I’m glad I pushed myself through the iterations to a version I’m satisfied with. It took hours of work, over multiple days, because walking away and getting some distance was definitely part of the process.

It’s not easy, but neither is writing a novel. You can do it.

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Literary Events in Los Angeles for the week of March 12, 2018

LitLifeLA March 12 2018
Guys, we have a big week ahead of us.
Where to even start?
I guess you have to start with the Mark Sarvas publication party at Diesel on Tuesday. Many a local writer has studied under Sarvas UCLA Extension and this is the first event celebrating his long-awaited second novel. And then Edan Lepucki on Sunday at Book Soup. Like Sarvas, she has fostered many aspiring authors in LA, but through an organization of her own making – the Writer’s Workshop LA. Then there’s Kristen Hannah – twice in one week. And TWELVE other readings… I mean, DANG. Take your pick.


TUESDAY


Farrah Penn reads from her debut novel Twelve Steps to Normal with Nicola Yoon

Buy the book
Tuesday, March 13, 2018
7:30pm
Skylight Books
1818 N Vermont Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90027


Publication Party! Mark Sarvas discusses and signs Memento Park

Buy the book
Tuesday, March 13, 2018
6:30pm to 7:30pm
DIESEL, A Bookstore
225 26th Street
Santa Monica, CA 90402


Library Foundation of Los Angeles presents Misfits Unite: Lidia Yuknavitch and Amber Tamblyn in conversation with Ann Friedman

Buy the book
Tuesday, Mar 13, 2018
7:30pm
Mark Taper Auditorium
Central Library
630 W 5th St.
Los Angeles 90071


Charles Ray: If You Can Read This You Are Dead

Tuesday, Mar 13, 2018
7:30pm
Billy Wilder Theater
Hammer Museum
10899 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90024


WEDNESDAY


Patrick Nathan, with Matthew Specktor, discusses and signs Some Hell

Buy the book
Wednesday, March 14, 2018
7:00pm
Book Soup
8818 Sunset Boulevard
West Hollywood, CA 90069


Farrah Penn and Heather Ezell discussing and signing their latest titles Twelve Steps to Normal & Nothing Left to Burn

Buy Twelve Steps to Normal | Buy Nothing Left to Burn
Wednesday, March 14, 2018
7:00pm
Vroman’s Bookstore
695 E. Colorado Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91101


THURSDAY


Kristin Hannah discusses and signs The Great Alone

Buy the book
Thursday, March 15, 2018
7:00pm
Book Soup
8818 Sunset Boulevard
West Hollywood, CA 90069


Lars Kepler discusses and signs The Sandman

Buy the book
Thursday, March 15, 2018
7:00pm
Vroman’s Bookstore
695 E. Colorado Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91101


Jen Wang’s The Prince & the Dressmaker in a panel discussion with Cory Doctorow,
Molly Knox Ostertag, and Tillie Walden

Buy the book
Thursday, March 15, 2018
7:00pm
Chevalier’s Books
126 N Larchmont Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90004


All Grown Up with Jami Attenberg

Buy the book
Thursday, March 15, 2018
8:00pm
The Last Bookstore
453 S Spring St – Ground Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013


FRIDAY


Roman Ausubel reads from her story collection Awayland and Michael Andreasen reads from his story collection The Seabeast Takes a Lover

Buy The Seabeast Takes a Lover
Friday, March 16, 2018
7:30pm
Skylight Books
1818 N Vermont Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90027


Author Luncheon with Kristin Hannah for The Great Alone

Buy the book (or buy a ticket and get a book)
Friday, March 16, 2018
12:00am to 9:00pm, $75 includes lunch and a copy of the book
DIESEL bookstore at
Amici Brentwood
2538 San Vicente Blvd.
Santa Monica, CA 90402


Alison Gaylin, with SW Lauden, discusses and signs If I Die Tonight

Buy the book
Friday, March 16, 2018
7:00pm
Vroman’s Bookstore
695 E. Colorado Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91101


Vroman’s Local Author Day introduces Lynne McKelvey and Thomas White

Buy A Real Daughter (the book, not a REAL daughter)
Saturday, March 17, 2018
4:00pm
Vroman’s Bookstore
695 E. Colorado Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91101


SUNDAY


Edan Lepucki, in conversation with Christine Frerichs, discusses and signs Woman No. 17

Buy the book
Sunday, March 18, 2018
4:00pm
Book Soup
8818 Sunset Boulevard
West Hollywood, CA 90069


Restore Me, #4 in the Shatter Me Series, with Tahereh Mafi

Buy the book
Sunday, March 18, 2018
2:00pm – “wristbanded event”
The Grove at Farmers Market
189 The Grove Drive Suite K 30
Los Angeles, CA 90036


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