Separation of Truth and Fact

On Sunday I was super lucky to attend an event hosted by my former thesis advisor Gina Nahai. It seems that back in July when the book Zealot

was released, Gina and her husband, in support of the Los Angeles Review of Books , hosted an event to celebrate its release, but the author, Reza Aslan, was obliged to rush home and help his wife with a sick toddler before he really got a chance to say much about his work.
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So this was their do-over event. Gina had already planned to have an alum event on the same day, so she just invited all of us (her former students) to attend. It was awesome.

This guy is one of the most well-spoken, thoughtful, and interesting authors I’ve had the pleasure of hearing speak.

The afternoon began with a discussion of this Fox interview wherein Lauren Green asks why he felt he was qualified to write a book about Jesus (as he is Muslim), and he lobs a response so far over her head intellectually that she is forced to simply continue reading from her teleprompter like and idiot. (It’s a fun 9 minutes if you can spare them).

Anyhow, back to Sunday’s event. Once we got past the Fox thing, someone asked a question that sparked a discussion of truth versus fact. He explained that up until about 200 years ago, it was truth that mattered. People told stories to impart truth, and that, more often than not, fact had little to do with it.

This is why so much of the bible contradicts itself. He made the point that the four gospels of the new testament were chosen from about 20. They were chosen because they were believed to be the most truthful.

Now we look at the bible, with our microscopes and carbon dating, and we look for fact. The way Aslan described it, the question of fact would have baffled the theologians of old. It makes sense really. Without all the scientific resources we have these days, the thing that would be the most important would be the truth, not the fact.

And actually, one could argue, that the same holds true today.

The literary world is always bickering over how much fact there is in any best selling memoir. But isn’t it the truth that matters most?

When we gather around the campfire and tell stories about our grandparents, or other lost loves, the details may get exaggerated, the facts may be distorted, but  the truth is passed on through generations. Did Uncle Art have five girlfriends at any given time? or fifteen? The truth is, he was a bit of a scoundrel, and we loved him for it.

Now, don’t quote me as saying fact doesn’t matter in non-fiction. I’m just saying, I love the idea of separating truth from fact. The words even sound like they mean different things. Truth, with it’s soft, soothing taper. Fact all hard and concrete.

Personally, I chose truth. But then again, I write fiction.

 

I Have Inspired Critical Thought

My Monday morning post has turned into my Monday evening post. So I’m running about 12 hours behind. I figure with the full time job, two kids under 6, the husband, the exercise, and oh yeah, the unfinished novel, a 12 hour lag is not so bad.

Besides, if I’ve learned anything from blogger JJ Keith

 (who is awesome, and if you don’t know her work you should), blog posts are usually better when written after a glass of wine (or three).

The news with me is that I am slated to submit a piece to Yes! Magazine in a couple weeks. It’s a response to the winners of a writing contest

based on an article I published with them a couple years back. It was a story I wrote about trying to avoid Monsanto products for a month. It was kind of a crazy little experiment that caught all kinds of flack. The Monsanto supporters hated me for obvious reasons, but the hippies came down on me too for not hating harder on GMO’s. It was a tumultuous time, made all the tougher  by the pregnancy hormones I didn’t yet know were coursing through my body.

Anyway, point is, Yes! Magazine held a writing contest wherein the prompt was my article. They sent me the stories written by the winners of the contest, and I am working on a thoughtful, witty, and smart response to their hard work.

I feel like I’ve hit a new point in my writing career. People are reading my work and responding to it, in their own writing. I have officially inspired critical thinking. I feel honored, and a little daunted. You know, as a writer you send stuff out into the world, and you assume some people read it. You might even go so far as to think that a few people not related to you stumbled upon it, but to sit down and read these essays from a range of people aged 9 to 20 (the winners are from three different categories: middle school, high school and college level) kind of blows ones mind. Or, at least, it blew mine.

I’ve read them all through, just as a first pass. I will likely read them each a few more times as I compose my thoughts. I want to write something that will convey how excited I am that the conversation about GMOs continues, that young people care about their health and their futures and are engaged in conversation about it. I also want to encourage them, and anyone else who has read my work, to keep an open mind. When we go into a conversation with our minds made up we might as well not bother. GMO’s are not going away, and there is many an argument for how they could be a source of great good. I guess my hope, ultimately, and the reason I feel so very honored to be a part of this whole thing, is that by being diligent in our questioning of how new technologies are managed we can have a part in ensuring their responsable use.

My official response is due July 17, so I have a couple weeks to work on it.

Rock Lake Writers Retreat

It’s getting harder and harder to carve out time for my fiction. Life gets busy, and with even the best intentions, I don’t set aside enough time for the work I really want to do.

So I’m very excited to say that my writing group has rallied to set aside a whole weekend in July to step outside our busy lives and work on our novels (or screenplays, as the case may be). It’s the first official Rock Lake Writers Retreat. Well, the rest of the gang went up to Colorado last year for five days, but it happened to coincide with my sister-in-law’s wedding and Daniels subsequent back surgery, so it wasn’t in the cards for me. And that doesn’t count anyway, because we didn’t officially name our group until about six months ago. Which reminds me, we are in the process of setting up a website for our group. In a few weeks I should be able to share a url, and these mysterious writing-group-friends will finally be a lot less mysterious. I bet you were starting to think I made them up.

Anyhow, where was I? Writing retreat. Yes.

IydllwildWe rented a vacation house in Idyllwild, that’s a photo of it at the right there. It’s a nice place with three bedrooms, and we’re splitting the cost between the five us. We’re going up on Friday the 19th and staying two nights.

I’m so excited. I am also unprepared. I have just three weeks to get ready to make the most of my precious few days up there. Basically, I just need to figure out what changes I still want to make to the manuscript. I think I mentioned in a previous post that I got some conflicting advice from my readers on the most recent pass, so I need to really think hard about where I want the story to go.

I’m also feeling tempted by a new story idea. It’s a non-ficion book that really needs to be written (by me). I’m meeting with my agent to run it past her on Friday (tomorrow – wow, that came up quick). If she thinks it’s as exciting as I do, it might be hard not to spend the retreat working on the proposal.

Damn this  creative life and its myriad potential writing projects.

Well, I have a few weeks to figure it out anyway.

Yes! National Student Writing Competition

I am super proud to announce that Yes! Magazine is using an article I wrote for them to act as the prompt for their annual Student Writing Competition

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The piece dates back to 2010, and outlines a very difficult month in which I impulsively tried to go for thirty-one days without eating, drinking, wearing or washing with any Monsanto products. Being all writerly, I blogged about the adventure, and it got me a lot of attention – some good (I landed an agent), and a lot of it not so good. The biggest lesson I learned was that people do not take their food politics lightly.

Seeing this article take on a new life has brought up some old anxiety that is reminding me of all the reasons I have since distanced myself from the project:

1. I got my very own angry stalker. A very nasty man (?) posted repeatedly on my blog using all caps, and words I will never repeat. The same individual sent frequent tweets about how I was a Monsanto plant and that I have a funny-looking nose. Why do I care what that a-hole thinks? I don’t, but the words he chose to express himself were upsetting nonetheless.

2. Numerous publications asked me to write for them – for free. While I don’t mind a little pro-bono work when I believe in a cause, I am also a professional writer, and I simply cannot spend all my time writing for no money. Mostly I just ended up telling them to republish the Yes! article (and a couple others I wrote), and then felt guilty for not doing more to educate people about their food.

3. People started calling me The Monsanto Girl. While a more appropriate title would have been The Nonsanto Girl, it wasn’t the monicker that bothered me so much as the creeping sensation that I would never be known as anything else. If you read my blog, you know that fiction is my true passion.

4. I was misquoted. A lot. Just for the record – the movie Food, Inc. did not inspire the project, the project was not a boycott in the traditional sense (I had no illusions that my not consuming Monsanto products would in any way make the company change its ways), and I am not an activist (at least not by any traditional definition).

5. People got really crazy about equating Monsanto with GMO and held me up as their poster girl. I actually think GMO’s may have a place in our food system, but I also believe that our government doesn’t do nearly enough (anything) to test GMO’s before they are fed to the masses and that scares me.

When I realized I was continually explaining myself and clarifying misconceptions, I decided it was time to take a step back, for the sake of my own sanity. I was in the middle of a very difficult pregnancy at the time, and I needed a little more calm in my life.

The funny thing is, the project has taken on a life of its own. I joined forces with a friend of mine who is very much into food politics, and we started the Digging Deep campaign which now has over 4,000 followers on Facebook. (My “Storyteller” Facebook page

has just under 200 – you should go Like it.)

At this point I more or less feel like a traveler who strolled over a hill and happened upon a war. I fought a battle or two, then looked around, decided this was not where I wanted to die and got the ef out of there. I have immense respect and gratitude for everyone who continues to fight the good fight, and if an article I wrote two and half years ago can help spark discussion, well, I am truly honored.

I get paid to be nosey.

I‘m very excited to announce that an article I wrote about my uncles went live today on the BETA Magazine website

. It’s titled “You, Me, and the Virus Makes Three: Serodiscordant Relationships in the 21st Century.”

For the word nerds – serodiscordant is a fairly new term describing a relationship wherein one person has HIV/AIDS and the other does not. My uncles have been in their serodiscordant relationship since before the term existed. It was a real treat to sit down with them and hear the details of their story.

When Terry was first diagnosed, I was young and nobody spoke much about it. It was still so taboo. By the time I was old enough to know about HIV/AIDS, Terry’s infection was old news, and there just never seemed to be a good time to ask the question: “so… do you guys still have sex, or what?”

Thankfully, in my line of work, I get paid to be nosey.

Check it out (here

) when you get a chance. They really do have a great story. I’m honored to get to tell it.

Finally, thank you to all the family and friends who have sent well wishes for Daniel’s recovery. We got to see an x-ray of his spine today. Check this baby out:

Those white things are the screws in my guy’s spine. Burly.

He was having a hard time getting comfortable in bed, so this morning we invested in a recliner. So he’s still laid up, but he’s doing it in style, the doc told him to keep the narcotics coming, and the Euro Cup, or something, is playing soccer non-stop (or so it seems) – so he’s doing just fine.

 

 

 

 

For Daniel

It may seem like I haven’t been blogging much the past two weeks, but really I’ve just been cheating on you.

My other blog, The Digging Deep Campaign

, has been going through some big changes. We added 6 new writers and I’ve been managing their posts, making myself dizzy with editorial work. As I’ve been getting used to the new schedule, I’m afraid I’ve been neglecting my own blog here. So sorry. I think I’ve got it under control now. If you haven’t checked out the Digging Deep blog in a while, you should stop by. We have new content EVERY DAY now, and it’s all good.

As for my own writing, I’m finishing up the polish on my Northern California book before sending it to the publisher. I’ve integrated the notes I got from my writing group, and am working on the fun intro material (basic history of Northern California, writing a personal preface, that sort of thing). The best part so far was dedicating it. I’ve never dedicated a book before. I’m giving this one to Daniel.

I thought about making the dedication read: “For Daniel, can we go home now?” We’ve been talking about moving back to Northern California since we got to LA, but somehow that didn’t seem right.

I opted instead for: “For Daniel, who loves Northern California almost as much as I do.”

It makes me wonder who I will dedicate my novel to. When I finish it, in like 30 years.